Enhancing capacity to deliver impact

V. Meadu

New manuals will help farmers in Kenya and Uganda earn carbon credits

East Africa
Low Emissions Development

Two innovative projects are supporting smallholder farmers to remove carbon from the atmosphere through improved agricultural practices and reforestation; they also earn extra cash from carbon credits. The 2 projects, run by ECOTRUST in Uganda and Vi-Agroforestry in Kenya, are already expected to mitigate an additional 675 000 tonnes of CO2, equivalent to the emissions of about 1.6 million barrels of oil and the annual emissions of 142 000 American cars. In January 2014, farmers in Kisumu and Kitale, Kenya, were the first in the world to earn income from carbon credits.

In 2014 farmers in western Kenya were the first in the world to receive income from carbon credits. In Uganda, farmers are already set to mitigate 675 000 tonnes of CO<sub>2</sub>, equivalent to the annual emissions of 142 000 cars in the US

In 2014 farmers in western Kenya were the first in the world to receive income from carbon credits. In Uganda, farmers are already set to mitigate 675 000 tonnes of CO2, equivalent to the annual emissions of 142 000 cars in the US.

Both projects want to reach more farmers and, given that carbon credit contracts can span decades, do so by engaging in a sustainable, long-term way. This requires building local capacity to deliver agricultural carbon initiatives. However managing and participating in such initiatives is a complex affair requiring the recruitment of sufficient numbers of farmers and training them in appropriate farming methods, monitoring carbon sequestration, distributing carbon payments and accessing global carbon markets.

Innovative training projects help farmers to sequester carbon and earn cash from carbon credits

Innovative training projects help farmers to sequester carbon and earn cash from carbon. V. Meadu

EcoAgriculture Partners was supported by CCAFS to develop training resources to build capacity among farmers, community-based organizations, local non-governmental organizations and government officials. Working with ENR Africa Associates in Uganda and Environmental Resources Management Center for Sustainable Development in Kenya, 2 manuals were published in 2014.

Already, as a result of follow-up trainings, an additional 2000 farmers have been reached with the potential to shift from hundreds to tens of thousands of farmers as local capacity is further enhanced.