Impact through policies and partnerships

S. Kilungu (CCAFS)
Outcomes & Impacts

Countries and partners use CCAFS science and analysis to put the Paris Agreement into action

East Africa
West Africa
Latin America
Southeast Asia
South Asia
Priorities and Policies for CSA
Low Emissions Development
Gender and Social Inclusion

The first analysis of countries' Intended Nationally Determined Contributions to the Paris Climate Agreement, published in November 2015 by CCAFS, demonstrated country-driven demand for mitigation of agricultural emissions. UNFCCC country negotiators, donors, and climate finance investors used this and subsequent sectoral and national analyses – published in papers and data sets and presented at meetings – to advocate that agriculture is a critical sector for action in climate change adaptation and mitigation.

“The CCAFS INDC analysis provided a clearer idea about the linkages between adaptation and mitigation in agriculture,” Giovanna Valverde Stark, negotiator for Costa Rica, said. “This and additional analyses were extremely useful for SBSTA discussions at COP22.”

Vietnam is taking a leading role in committing to adaptation and mitigation in agriculture. With a strong agriculture sector that is very vulnerable to climate change, in 2016 Vietnam's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development committed to climate change mitigation through widespread adoption of the alternate wetting and drying (AWD) method for growing irrigated rice in the implementation plan for the country’s Nationally Determined Contribution.

Scaling up AWD is already in process. Vietnam’s Institute of Agricultural Environment (IAE), and the Institute of Policy and Strategy for Agriculture and Rural Development (IPSARD), in collaboration with CCAFS, the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), and the Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC) – developed and used climatic AWD suitability maps, analyzed opportunities and barriers of adoption, and contributed to a national working group at Vietnam’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD). MARD is scaling out water saving technologies in rice and regularly sharing key findings with decision-makers.

“We must take action in response to climate change from now on. The INDC for the 2021-2030 period does not mean that we will wait until 2021 to begin,” said Dinh Vu Thanh, Deputy Director of Science, Technology and Environment for Vietnam’s Ministry of Agricultural and Rural Development. “We will prioritize solutions of highest feasibility and efficiency and lowest cost.”

The United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and World Bank are also utilizing the CCAFS analyses to develop innovative climate change and agriculture solutions. In the report Making climate finance work in agriculture, for example, CCAFS, DFID, and the World Bank explore how to leverage private capital and strengthen links among financial institutions, small and medium enterprises, and smallholder farmers.

Partners

  • International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)
  • International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)
  • University of Copenhagen
  • University of Vermont
  • Vietnam: Institute of Agricultural Environment (IAE), Institute of Policy and Strategy for Agriculture and Rural Development (IPSARD), Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD)
  • Development partners: Climate and Clean Air Coalition (CCAC), Root Capital, United Kingdom Department for International Development (DFID), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), World Bank